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RAMSES-MHD

RAMSES is a finite volume Godunov type code with adaptive mesh facilities. The original version (pure hydrodynamics) is available here.

The MHD version was developed in the framework of MAGNET, and is available on this service.

We also provide a test suite in order to check the correct software installation and estimate the code accuracy.

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Last update 01-26-2007 11:55 am / Romain Teyssier

Zeus3d+

Zeus3d+ is a fully parallel (MPI), conservative version of the 3D version of the well-known Zeus code. You will find the original Zeus code at Jim Stone's Zeus code home page. In addition, Zeus3d+ accepts non-uniform physical viscosity and resistivity and allows for any cooling function. The last version of Zeus3d+ can be downloaded here.

A few bugs are listed which you may (or may not !) find present in your version of the Zeus code (if you own one already).

Ongoing work: as the code is being benchmarked against new test cases, not all keywords are currently available.

And an evenmore recent version of my work on Zeus can be downloaded here.

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Last update 02-24-2009 12:31 pm / Pierre Lesaffre

Heracles

HERACLES is a 3D hydrodynamical code used to simulate astrophysical fluid flows. It uses a finite volume method on fixed grids to solve the equations of hydrodynamics, MHD, radiative transfer and gravity.

Access to the Heracles download page

Last update 05-18-2011 04:21 pm / Emmanuel Dormy

The HECKLE code

The HECKLE code has been written by R. Smets and N. Aunai.

This is a hybrid code (protons are treated as macro-particles and electrons as a fluid) with two spatial dimensions and three velocity dimensions. The code is partly parallelized using MPI.The electromagnetic fields are calculated self-consistently using a predictor-corrector scheme by Harned (1982). A detail of the algorithm is also provided in Winske & Quest (1986). The displacement current is neglected in the Maxwell-Faraday equation. Such an assumption prevents the development of high frequency modes. Ohm's law is then needed to compute the electric field, that takes into account the Hall term and the electron pressure term.

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Last update 05-18-2011 04:11 pm / Emmanuel Dormy